1. Tires

Starting from the bottom, tires are crucial. It is important to get into the habit of checking tire pressure as soon as you get a new car. You should be aware of the conditions for tire usage and the wear safety lines before using them. Don’t forget to tell them that new tires are slippery and need some time to break in and adjust to the road surface.

2. Pay attention to your chain

Develop a good habit of regularly checking your vehicle’s chain. You must correctly inform them about wheel alignment and the proper tension setting of the chain. This information is usually indicated by the manufacturer near the rear fork. Clean the chain regularly and use the correct lubricant to ensure smooth and efficient performance when using the motorcycle!

3. Brake Basics

Perhaps a lesson that involves bleeding hands from braking shouldn’t be the first on the agenda for new riders, but you can at least inform them about some motorcycle braking aspects. For instance, you can teach them how to inspect brake pads and brake fluid, as well as how to identify brake-related issues such as warped brake discs or sticking brake caliper pistons. If you feel they are ready, you can demonstrate in person how to disassemble, clean, and safely reinstall brake calipers.

4. Perfect Control

Obtaining a driver’s license is just the beginning of their motorcycle riding journey. The first few kilometers of riding are crucial for developing the rider’s skills, confidence, and safety for future rides, and all of it hinges on proper control. The best way to set up your friend or relative for success is by lubricating the brake lever shaft and clutch lever shaft and adjusting a perfect clutch engagement point.

5. Usage of Oil

Don’t assume that checking the oil related to motorcycles is easy. Instruct them to follow the manufacturer’s instructions for their bike when it comes to changing the oil, including the recommended oil grade, quantity, brake fluid grade, and other specifications. Additionally, remind them to use unopened brake fluid and try to use it all at once, as brake fluid has a strong tendency to absorb moisture. Also, advise them to keep it away from the vehicle’s body and paint due to its corrosive nature.

6. Torque Setting

For a new rider, it is important to learn to use regular wrenches or sockets as little as possible when tightening screws. Encourage your friend to purchase a torque wrench and teach them how to use it and where to find the correct settings, such as the specified torque value required by the manufacturer for a particular screw.

7. Cleaning

This is particularly important because not all types of chemical cleaners can be used on every part of a motorcycle. For example, gasoline is not suitable for cleaning the chain or areas with rubber seals, despite its excellent degreasing properties. Therefore, encourage them to develop the habit of using the appropriate cleaning tools and chemicals to clean their beloved bike.

8. Warm-up

This is essential information that novice riders must know. Motorcycles require more precision than cars, and the engine should be fully warmed up and lubricated before riding. The tires also need time to heat up, which refers to the tire temperature generated after a certain distance of friction between the tire and the ground.

9. Chassis Inspection

Experienced riders should be able to identify chassis issues, but for novice riders, some chassis problems may not be apparent. Help them inspect their motorcycle and provide them with some explanations.

10. Warm-up

This is essential information that novice riders must know. Motorcycles require more precision than cars, and the engine should be fully warmed up and lubricated before riding. The tires also need time to heat up, which refers to the tire temperature generated after a certain distance of friction between the tire and the ground.